Seal of the Association

Original seal

At the 1967 annual meeting, the membership delegated the authority to adopt the Associate’s seal:

NAVA seal- On a motion presented by the President [Pierre Lux-Wurm], seconded by Mr. [William] Dwiggins, the following resolution was adopted:

Resolved that the Flag and Seal Committee be empowered to select a design for a corporate seal, to have a die of the seal made at the expense of the Association and to have printed for the use of the elected officers and committees of the Association a reasonable quanity of stationery bearing the emblem.

The Association’s original seal is described in the March 1968 issue of NAVA News:

The NAVA Flag and Seal Committee also met [on March 3, 1968], electing Gary Grahl as chairman and Thomas Hill as secretary. The committee reviewed the four designs, which had been submitted in the NAVA seal contest, and voted in favor of a design by Whitney Smith. A copy of the seal and an explanation of its symbolism are attached.

NAVA seal as drawn by Whitney Smith of the Native American maiden riding an armadillo

Original seal designed by Whitney Smith

. . . .

Since the Renaissance artists, sculptors, and others have made use of four allegorical female figures, representing the four continents — Europe, America, Asia, and Africa. (See, for example, the end-papers in W.J. Gordon’s Flags of the World.)

Each of these figures is shown with “typical” dress and with an animal peculiar to the continent. America, comprising the whole New World, appears as an Indian maiden with headdress, quiver and bow, and often with a parrot. The armadillo is her mount.

For the seal of the North American Vexillological Association it is proposed to show America and her armadillo to symbolize the geographical extent of the society. Although the arrows of war are not missing, she holds before her a flag to represent the exploration of new territories and a book for the pursuits of statesmen as the sources of new flags in North America.

The flag is that of the Association and of course the book suggests the scholarly interests of its members. Those who wish to do so may read into the armadillo the qualities of the vexillologist — slow but sure progress, a tendency to burrow deeply, and imperviousness to outside pressures.

Dr. Smith’s seal design was adopted on March 3, 1968:

Flag and Seal Committee Report– The chairman, Mr. [Gary] Grahl, reported that the committee had selected the entry of Mr. Whitney Smith as the NAVA seal, to be used on the Association’s stationery and publications.

. . . .

NAVA Stationery– By general consent, the President [Whitney Smith] was authorized to design and order a sufficient quantity of NAVA stationery, using the newly adopted seal.

Second seal

navaseal

Second seal designed by David Martucci

The original seal was short lived as another design was adopted at the October 12–13,1968 annual meeting:

9. NAVA Seal– On a motion by Mr. [George) Cahill, the Association set aside the design for a NAVA seal adopted by the Flag and Seal Committee on March 3, 1968. Carried.

10. New NAVA Seal– After general discussion, the membership agreed that the seal of the North American Vexillological Association should be the design submitted by Mr. David Martucci, the design being the flag of the Association displayed above a globe tilted to give prominence to North America, the whole surrounded by the name of the Association and the date 1967, within two concentric circles.

The new seal was described in the April 1969 issue of NAVA News:

NEW OFFICIAL NAVA SEAL
A reproduction of the new official NAVA seal appears at left. This seal is the result of action taken by the NAVA membership at the annual meeting in October, 1968. On a motion by Mr. [George] Cahill, the membership voted to set aside the design for a NAVA seal which had been adopted by the Flag and Seal Committee in March, 1968. After general discussion, the membership agreed that the seal of the North American Vexillological Association should be the design submitted by Mr. David Martucci, the design being the flag of the Association displayed above a globe of the world tilted to give prominence to North America, the whole being surrounded by the name of the Association and the date 1967, within two concentric circles.

The artwork for the new seal was prepared under the supervision of Capt. James W. Clark of Bel Air, Maryland. It is his intention to have the original drawing framed, and to present it to the Association as an historic document.

David Martucci has made the following humorous and gracious comment: “My design beat out Whitney Smith’s, but only because some of the members didn’t think a half-naked Indian maiden on an armadillo was ‘proper!’ I still think his design is better than mine!”

The actual 1 ¾ inch seal was ordered by Emmet V. Mittebeeler on July 14, 1969 from Lamb Seal & Stencil Co. of Washington, D.C. The cost of the seal was US$ 57.20.

In 1991, the flag’s design was incorporated into Bylaws section 2.01. The Bylaws provide that the “corporate seal shall be kept by the secretary and used only as directed by the executive board.”

Neither the Association’s flag or seal may be used for commercial or personal purposes without the written permission of the executive board, except that members may use the Association’s flag for personal, non-profit purposes.