Volume 6 (1999)

raven6Available: out of print, online only (links below)

Raven continues its tradition of publishing outstanding articles in the field of flags. This year’s volume presents four papers that have won the Driver Award, the pinnacle of scholarship among Association members. The award, presented for the best paper presented at an annual meeting, honors Captain William Driver, who originated the phrase “Old Glory” to refer to the U.S. flag.


The Pike-Pawnee Flag Incident:  Reexamining a Vexillological Legend
Anne M. Platoff, M.S., M.A., instruction librarian, Arizona State University Libraries
The most famous flag incident in Kansas history may have actually occurred in Nebraska. The mythology surrounding Zebulon Pike’s 1806 encounter with the Republican Pawnee Indians yields to present-day historical analysis.

Also available from PDC


Majulah Singapura: National Day and Flag Culture in a Southeast Asian City-State
Scot M. Guenter, Ph.D., professor, San Jose State University, California
A year in Singapore as a Fulbright fellow provided the author the opportunity to observe flag use in a country whose national symbols reflect its unique politics, history, and culture. Many photographs illustrate reflections on the strategies Singapore uses to make the flag a centerpiece of civic pride.

Also available from PDC


The Revolutionary Communist Party and Flag Burning During its Forgotten Years, 1979-1989
Robert Justin Goldstein, Ph.D., professor, Oakland University, Rochester, Michigan
Filling in a little-known era between the author’s definitive books and articles on the U.S. flag desecration controversy, this article examines the role of the RCP in post-Viet Nam War flag-burning incidents culminating in the Supreme Court’s landmark Texas v. Johnson ruling.

Also available from PDC


American Perspectives on Heraldry and Vexillology
Whitney Smith, Ph.D., executive director, Flag Research Center, Winchester, Massachusetts
The world’s foremost vexillologist compares the sciences of heraldry and vexillology, through a review of civic symbolism in the United States and its manifestation on flags. He distinguishes it from European heraldry, and challenges heraldists to apply the same scientific principles as vexillology.

Also available from PDC


  • Edward B. Kaye, Managing Editor
  • Peter J. Orenski, Ph.D., Art/Production Editor
  • Editorial Board:
  • Scot M. Guenter, San José State University
  • Anne M. Platoff, Arizona State University
  • John M. Purcell, Cleveland State University (emeritus)